thisisbandofoutsiders:

Spring.
Frank Ocean in Band of Outsiders.
Photographed by Scott Sternberg at the Los Angeles Times Building. 
New images drop here and on our instagram (@thisisbandofoutsiders) through Sunday.

thisisbandofoutsiders:

Spring.

Frank Ocean in Band of Outsiders.

Photographed by Scott Sternberg at the Los Angeles Times Building. 

New images drop here and on our instagram (@thisisbandofoutsiders) through Sunday.

Reblogged from Band of Outsiders
latimes:

We’ve got a fantastic MLK gallery on Framework.
Photo: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta, lead a march in Georgia. Credit: Associated Press

latimes:

We’ve got a fantastic MLK gallery on Framework.

Photo: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta, lead a march in Georgia. Credit: Associated Press

Reblogged from Los Angeles Times
A South Korean’s unwanted war legacy from Japan
In 1944, he was abducted from his village by Japanese soldiers and forced to dig tunnels at a World War II camp. In 2005, he learned he was mistakenly listed among Japan’s war dead at a Tokyo shrine.
For most of his life, Kim Hui-jong has kept what he considers a shameful secret. In 1944, as a teenager, he was abducted from his village in northern Korea by Japanese soldiers and forced to dig tunnels at a World War II military camp on the island of Saipan.
It would take him a decade of marriage to tell his wife about his past. Kim, 86, still often dreams of the battlefield shelling that severely damaged his hearing and the taunts of his captors: “You Koreans are like canned meat; we can take you anywhere and use you as we see fit.”
He always considered his Japanese enslavement, and the two years he later spent as a U.S. prisoner of war, as a lifelong humiliation. Then, in 2005, Kim received a new insult he insists he still cannot bear: For decades, the former conscript learned, he has been counted among Japan’s war dead and, because of an administrative error, his name is listed at Tokyo’s controversial Yasukuni shrine. He could no longer remain silent.
 Above: Kim Hui-jong, 86, of South Korea, has been trying to get Japan to remove his name from a list of that country’s World War II dead: “I never fought for the Japanese; I was a forced laborer.” (Matt Douma, For The Times / August 15, 2011)
——-
This is awful. Yes, the relationship between South Korea and Japan has always been an extremely complicated one. As the American-born daughter of two South Korean immigrants, I’ve always known that. (If you don’t believe me, ask any Korean person what they think of the Dokdo Islands.) Kim Hui-Jong’s story breaks my heart.

A South Korean’s unwanted war legacy from Japan

In 1944, he was abducted from his village by Japanese soldiers and forced to dig tunnels at a World War II camp. In 2005, he learned he was mistakenly listed among Japan’s war dead at a Tokyo shrine.

For most of his life, Kim Hui-jong has kept what he considers a shameful secret. In 1944, as a teenager, he was abducted from his village in northern Korea by Japanese soldiers and forced to dig tunnels at a World War II military camp on the island of Saipan.

It would take him a decade of marriage to tell his wife about his past. Kim, 86, still often dreams of the battlefield shelling that severely damaged his hearing and the taunts of his captors: “You Koreans are like canned meat; we can take you anywhere and use you as we see fit.”

He always considered his Japanese enslavement, and the two years he later spent as a U.S. prisoner of war, as a lifelong humiliation. Then, in 2005, Kim received a new insult he insists he still cannot bear: For decades, the former conscript learned, he has been counted among Japan’s war dead and, because of an administrative error, his name is listed at Tokyo’s controversial Yasukuni shrine. He could no longer remain silent.

Above: Kim Hui-jong, 86, of South Korea, has been trying to get Japan to remove his name from a list of that country’s World War II dead: “I never fought for the Japanese; I was a forced laborer.” (Matt Douma, For The Times / August 15, 2011)

——-
This is awful. Yes, the relationship between South Korea and Japan has always been an extremely complicated one. As the American-born daughter of two South Korean immigrants, I’ve always known that. (If you don’t believe me, ask any Korean person what they think of the Dokdo Islands.) Kim Hui-Jong’s story breaks my heart.
latimes:

Clear your evening plans: The 2011 Perseid meteor shower is best seen tonight.
Photo: Mt. Pinos in California blocks out light pollution from below, offering a couple a view of the Perseids meteor showers in 2010. Credit: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Go outside. Look up.

latimes:

Clear your evening plans: The 2011 Perseid meteor shower is best seen tonight.

Photo: Mt. Pinos in California blocks out light pollution from below, offering a couple a view of the Perseids meteor showers in 2010. Credit: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Go outside. Look up.

Reblogged from Los Angeles Times
latimes:

In a column published Monday, Steve Lopez wrote that Southwest would offer flights from Burbank to LAX during Carmageddon. That was satire. 
Now, JetBlue is offering a flyover from Long Beach to Burbank for $4. Not satire.

LOL. Ridiculous. I think it’s funny, but such a waste of fuel.
More thoughts re: Carmageddon: While I get the knee-jerk reaction to tell everyone “Get the hell outta Dodge,” I feel like there could’ve been more of a push to just stay local and maybe discover a new bar down the street, and a restaurant around the corner. It’s entirely possible to survive by walking or biking to your local businesses. It’s better for the local economy as well as the environment.

latimes:

In a column published Monday, Steve Lopez wrote that Southwest would offer flights from Burbank to LAX during Carmageddon. That was satire. 

Now, JetBlue is offering a flyover from Long Beach to Burbank for $4. Not satire.

LOL. Ridiculous. I think it’s funny, but such a waste of fuel.

More thoughts re: Carmageddon: While I get the knee-jerk reaction to tell everyone “Get the hell outta Dodge,” I feel like there could’ve been more of a push to just stay local and maybe discover a new bar down the street, and a restaurant around the corner. It’s entirely possible to survive by walking or biking to your local businesses. It’s better for the local economy as well as the environment.

Reblogged from Los Angeles Times